At St. Lawrence Kigoowa Primary School

Mentor Her

Through our Mentor Her initiative, we conducted a baseline survey to establish key priority areas at St. Lawrence Kigoowa Primary School. According to the survey, eight in ten girls were exposed to violence, two in ten girls were assaulted, nine in ten girls lacked sanitary pads, nine in ten girls lacked scholastic materials, four in ten girls wanted to get married young, nine in ten girls lacked school fees, seven in ten girls were bullied at school, five in ten girls lacked self-esteem and ten in ten girls needed information on reproductive health.

In partnership with Uganda Youth and Adolescent Health Forum, we conducted our first mentorship session on Menstruation Health Management where we engaged both boys and girls to ensure greater support and successful empowerment. Discussions were held to assess the existing knowledge, attitudes, myths, and practices around MHM.

In partnership with Wilmat Development Foundation, we conducted a self-awareness session where the participants were equipped with self-directed learning skills that motivated them and also prepared them for a dynamic professional landscape. 

In partnership with Aid You, we conducted a COVID 19 sensitization session where participants were sensitized about the virus and exposed to different ways of preventing the spread of COVID19 in schools, homes, and communities.

Vase Of Transformation mentored 150 adolescent girls and boys from St. Lawrence Kigoowa Primary Schoo

Vase Of Transformation empowered 100 young girls from the Soweto slum.

Every pad counts

This project aimed at addressing period poverty an injustice that affects young girls from marginalized communities who have limited access to sanitary pads. Due to a lack of funds to purchase proper sanitary pads, some resort to using toilet paper, scrap cloth, polythene bags, leaves, and others share reusable sanitary pads. This creates a high risk of venereal transmitted diseases.

The project was implemented in Soweto Namuwongo one of Kampala’s largest and poorest informal urban settlements with up to 30,000 residents in partnership with Peace First and Uganda Hands for Hope. 

Vase Of Transformation empowered 100 young girls from the Soweto slum.

The girls were equipped with hands-on skills in making reusable sanitary pads addressing SDG 3.

Project was implemented in Kasenyi Banda slum

Unlocking the potential of child mothers

40% of girls in Uganda are married before their 18th birthday, and one in 10 is married before the age of 15. According to UNICEF, Uganda has the 16th highest prevalence rate of child marriage in the world and the tenth highest absolute number of child brides globally – 787,000. Child marriage disproportionately impacts girls, depriving them of their education, health, and safety. 

This project was implemented in Kasenyi Banda slum built on a floodplain, vulnerable and dangerous in the rainy season. Kasenyi Banda is a physically challenging place where the safety and health of child mothers and their children are always in the balance. The fact that these child mothers try to hustle through such hardships, testifies to their resilience and determination.

According to the survey, we conducted, several of them got pregnant below the age of 16 years. They faced complicated deliveries, some under cesarean selections, faced post-delivery complications, and are currently suffering from lack of a daily meal, lack of clothes for their babies, and their standard of living is poor. These girls feel isolated and dis-empowered.

Vase Of Transformation equipped these 20 teenage mothers with Jewellery making skills to enable them to build a self-sustaining mentality through hands-on skills development. After the training, each one of them received a starter kit to help them start up Jewellery making business. Currently, 20 of our child mothers are gainfully self-employed and can fend for themselves and their children. Addressing SDG 1& 8.

project was implemented in partnership with Pro Care Foundation and sponsored by Coca-Cola Beverages and Uganda Business and Technical Examinations Board.

Pads for missy

The Pads For Missy Drive aimed to equip girls from Soroti district the eastern part of Uganda with skills to make reusable sanitary pads, teach them safe menstrual hygiene practices, but also distributed supplies like; disposable sanitary pads, reusable sanitary pads, and soap to enable them to manage their periods with ease. During our outreaches, we visited five communities; Vocational Training Institute School, Bethany Girls Comprehensive Secondary School, St. Stephen’s Community Opiai, St. Augustine Church Camp Swahili, and Opuyo community

Some of the challenges that hindered these girls from having safe and peaceful periods were the lack of sanitary pads, the lack of knickers, the lack of washing soap, the lack of Vaseline, painful menstrual cramps, and others lacked information on how to manage periods.

This project was implemented in partnership with Pro Care Foundation and sponsored by Coca-Cola Beverages and Uganda Business and Technical Examinations Board.

Vase Of Transformation empowered 650 girls from 5 communities in the Eastern region of Uganda

project was implemented in partnership with Namugongo Fund For Special Children, and Peace First reaching out to 50 adolescent boys, girls, young women and men

Dare to speak up!

According to the Uganda Police Force’s annual crime report, gender-based violence cases that were reported and investigated increased by 4% (from 38,651 to 40,258 cases) between 2015 and 2016. The 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey revealed that up to 22% of women aged 15 to 49 in the country had experienced some form of sexual violence. The report also revealed that annually, 13% of women aged 15 to 49 report experiencing sexual violence. This translates to more than 1 million women being exposed to sexual violence every year in Uganda. Violence against women has recently taken new, more sophisticated forms

This project aimed at raising awareness about GBV and to create a platform for intervention, and ensure that SGBV survivors could confidentially report incidents and have timely and non-discriminatory access to services and support, including medical, psychosocial, legal, and material assistance, as well as safe spaces where needed. 

This project was implemented in partnership with Namugongo Fund For Special Children, and Peace First reaching out to 50 adolescent boys, girls, young women and men.

The project empowered 50 young people from the Bussi Island Community

Reusable sanitary pads skilling

Adolescent marginalized girls from Bussi Island Mabamba, face a myriad of Menstrual Hygiene Management challenges including a lack of information, products, and services. Due to a lack of funds to purchase proper sanitary pads, they resort to using unhygienic materials such as cow dung, dry sand, leaves, sisal fibers, pieces of mattress, and blankets to manage their menses. And some, in exchange for pads, trade sex with men, twice their age, exposing them to early pregnancies, abortions, HIV/AIDS, and sexually transmitted infections.

Bussi Island is not that popular an island. The Island remains secluded and visibly detached. It is a hard-to-reach area, because of the inefficient means of transport. The Island has the poor physical infrastructure and no definite means of transport. A wooden canoe is the starting point for anyone visiting the Island.

The project involved stakeholders, school administrators, parents, guardians, and young people through meetings and dialogue sessions but also empowered them with reusable sanitary pads skills.

The project empowered 50 young people from the Bussi Island Community.

The project was conducted in Masindi District the Western part of Uganda.

Empowerment and livelihood project

With a growing population of 41.5 million people, nearly 60% of Uganda’s population are adolescents aged below twenty. This young generation faces multiple challenges including health and economic ones associated with early pregnancy, unemployment, and other factors. A large number of them are unable to generate enough income to support themselves.

This project was implemented in partnership with Imarisha Dada and Straight Talk Foundation. The project raised awareness on School-Related Gender-Based Violence, Peer Pressure, Bullying, Menstrual Hygiene, and empowered young people with liquid soap making skills, jewelry making, and reusable sanitary pads.

The project was conducted in Masindi District the Western part of Uganda reaching out to 634 young people from 4 communities.

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